Dallas County Reports 306 COVID-19 Cases Tuesday, 8 More Deaths -Fort Worth

Dallas County Reports 306 COVID-19 Cases Tuesday, 8 More Deaths -Fort Worth
For the seventh straight day, Dallas County is reporting more than 300 new COVID-19 cases along with eight more deaths. Dallas County Health and Human Service confirmed 306 additional cases were added Tuesday, along with the deaths of seven people in Dallas and one in Hutchins, including: A Dallas man in his 30s who had…

For the seventh straight day, Dallas County is reporting more than 300 new COVID-19 cases along with eight more deaths.

Dallas County Health and Human Service confirmed 306 additional cases were added Tuesday, along with the deaths of seven people in Dallas and one in Hutchins, including:

  • A Dallas man in his 30s who had underlying health conditions and was critically ill in an area hospital
  • A Hutchins man in his 40s who had underlying health conditions and was critically ill in an area hospital.
  • A Dallas woman in her 40s who had underlying health conditions and was critically ill in an area hospital.
  • A Dallas man in his 60s who had underlying health conditions and was critically ill in an area hospital.
  • A Dallas man in his 60s who had underlying health conditions and was critically ill in an area hospital.
  • A Dallas woman in her 70s who had underlying health conditions and was critically ill in an area hospital.
  • A Dallas woman in her 90s who had underlying health conditions and who died at the long-term care facility where she lived.
  • A Dallas woman in her 90s who had underlying health conditions and who died at the long-term care facility where she lived.

The number of new cases added Tuesday is slightly lower than the county’s seven-day average, which from Wednesday, June 10 through Tuesday, June 16, is 314 new COVID-19 cases per day.

There are now 14,843 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Dallas County with 293 deaths. According to the Texas Department of State Health Services, an estimated 9,294 people (through Tuesday) in the county have recovered from the virus leaving an estimated 5,256 active cases in the county.

“Today we announced the death of eight people who lost their battle with COVID-19, ranging from a person in their 30s to people in their 90s,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins. “I’ve also sent a letter today asking the governor to consider requiring masking. There is increased evidence that wearing a mask is the single most important thing we can do to prevent the spread of COVID-19.”

Abbott, in a news conference Tuesday, said he felt like Jenkins was looking to jail people for not wearing masks and that that wasn’t the right approach. He said Jenkins has other strategies available to him that he has not “lifted a finger” to use. While Abbott agrees that masks are important and recommends people wear them in public, he’s not supporting making it an enforceable mandate.

Jenkins replied and said no one would be jailed under the county or city’s orders and that, “I’m simply asking the governor to lead on the masking requirement the medical experts say is the single most important thing we can do right now to prevent spread or allow local governments to lead on this important issue.”

DCHHS said local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk seen below) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response.

“Please avoid crowds, maintain six-foot distancing when out, wear a cloth face covering, and use strong hygiene. It’s up to all of us to flatten the curve. There are many other important matters in your life and in the world right now, but we must keep our health and the health of our community at the top of our minds as we address those other important matters. The best way to keep you and your family safe is ‘Stay Home, Save Lives,'” said Jenkins.

To date, of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders and other essential functions.

Of cases requiring hospitalization, two-thirds have been under 65 years of age, and about half do not have high-risk chronic health conditions. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The county has been reporting for several weeks now that more than a third of the deaths related to COVID-19 have been among residents of long-term care facilities.

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